My Blog
By Prime Pediatrics
March 02, 2018
Category: Child health
Tags: Baby Care   Nail Care   Infants  


When it comes to caring for your baby, nail care is often overlooked. In the first few months of life, you may not be too worried about caring for your baby’s nails. But at some point your little one will take a swipe at you, and you will quickly find out how sharp those nails are. Baby nail care is easy—for the most part. Your pediatrician is available to offer helpful tips to ensure proper care for your baby’s nails.

Proper nail care can be as simple as trimming the nails when they get long enough to scratch you. However, your baby may squirm and move around, which makes cutting his or her nails difficult. Your pediatrician, we want the process of cutting your baby’s nails to be as easy as possible, which is why we are available to offer friendly advice.

There is no wrong way to cut your baby’s nails, as long as you do not nick the baby, and the nails get trimmed. Your pediatrician shares some basic tips:

  • Clean your baby’s hands, feet and nails during regular bathing.
  • Hold your baby’s finger and palm steady with one hand and trim with the other.
  • Press down on the fleshy pad of his or her fingertip to move the skin away from the nail.
  • Cut along the shape of the nail and snip any sharp corners or use an emery board.

While these tips may be easy to follow, some parents may still remain concerned about cutting their baby’s nails. If you are still concerned, follow these tips to make the job easier:

  • Have your partner hold the baby while you trim the nails.
  • Do it while your baby is sleeping.
  • Use only baby nail clippers to trim the nails.
  • Wait until your baby is in a good mood and find something to distract him or her, such as a new video, toy or snack.

Visit your pediatrician for more information on how to care for your baby, including proper nail care.

By Prime Pediatrics
February 06, 2018
Category: Safety
Tags: Safety   Infant   Baby Care  
Your child’s safety is your responsibility, even when your baby is sleeping.Your pediatrician is available to provide you with helpful tips to keep your baby safe while he or she is sleeping.

While you may find relief when your baby is asleep, it is still important to practice safety to ensure your baby’s health. Some helpful tips offered from your pediatrician include:
  • All infants should be put down for sleep on their back to reduce the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
  • Avoid soft bedding that might suffocate your baby, such as pillows, blankets, plush toys, and bumpers.
  • Crib slats should be 2 3/8 inches apart or less so that your baby’s head cannot get trapped.
  • Keep your baby’s room at a moderate temperature and dress them in a way that will prevent them from overheating to also reduce the risk for SIDS.
  • Share a bedroom with your newborn—but not a bed.
  • Avoid devices marketed to reduce the risk of SIDS, such as sleep positioners.

Nursing your baby and making sure that your baby gets all of the recommended vaccines can help protect against SIDS. Your pediatrician is available to provide you with the right information to protect your baby and keep him or her healthy and that includes proper care while they are sleeping.

By Prime Pediatrics
January 15, 2018
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Strep Throat  

Having strep throat seems to be a rite of passage for most children. It's a highly contagious bacterial infection, but many of its symptoms strep throatcan mimic other issues. At Prime Pediatrics in Gaithersburg, MD, Dr. Farnoush Jamali and physician's assistant Jessica Vossler have years of experience in diagnosing and treating strep throat. Below, they've listed a few of the common signs of strep throat and why they occur.

Sore throat

A painfully scratchy throat can be the first sign that strep has invaded and it's time to visit your child's doctor in Gaithersburg. That's because the tonsils, located on the very back of the roof of the mouth, are essentially large lymph nodes that help the body fight infection. Unfortunately, part of the way they work is by trapping the infectious particles - in this case, the strep bacteria - leading to them becoming swollen, inflamed and painful as they protect the rest of the body. The lymph nodes located under the jaw may also swell and be painful to the touch.


A fever, usually over 101 degrees Fahrenheit, is often one of the hallmarks of strep throat. This is due to the body's immune system fighting off the strep bacteria. However, it's important to remember that a sore throat accompanied by a fever can also be due to a viral infection, which is why it's important to make an appointment with your Gaithersburg children's doctor any time you aren't sure about the cause of your child's illness.

Other symptoms

Some of our patients at Prime Pediatrics who have strep throat also experience additional symptoms, including a headache, nausea or vomiting. When strep occurs with a red, sunburn-like rash that starts above the neck and spreads downward, it's known as scarlet fever. It sounds dangerous, but your Gaithersburg children's doctor treats scarlet fever the same way as regular strep throat, with antibiotics and rest at home.

A simple swab of the tonsils will help your Gaithersburg, MD, children's doctor diagnose strep. If you think your child may be deal with strep throat, contact Prime Pediatrics today to schedule an appointment with Dr. Jamali or Jessica Vossler today!

By Prime Pediatrics
January 02, 2018
Category: Child health
Tags: Tanning   Adolescents   Skin Cancer  

As the skin cancer rate continues to rise, many of us can’t help but wonder why people continue to expose themselves to harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation. A tan, whether it’s acquired from the pool, in a salon or through incidental exposure, is always dangerous.

The use of tanning beds today is an especially common practice among teenagers, specifically the female population. What many young girls don’t realize, however, is that the bronzed image they so desire is only the skin’s visible reaction to damage from harmful UV rays. Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, is now the second most common cancer seen in young adults. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, nearly 28 million people tan indoors in the United States annually. Of these, 2.3 million are teens. Their findings go on to report that 70 percent of tanning salon users are Caucasian girls and women, primarily aged 16 to 29 years.

Skin cancer aside, basking in UV rays—indoor or outdoors—also leads to premature aging of the skin. That means that even just a few minutes of exposure each day over the years without protection can cause noticeable changes to the skin later in life. Freckles, age spots, leathery skin, wrinkles, saggy skin and uneven skin tone can all be traced to UV exposure. 

The good news is that skin cancer and premature aging of the skin can easily be prevented. For one, stay away from tanning beds. Pediatricians also recommend that children and teens wear proper clothing, hats and sunglasses when outdoors. Always use sunscreen and avoid exposure during peak hours of 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Finding Alternatives

There is no such thing as a safe tan. Talk to your teen about the serious, life-threatening consequences of tanning. If your teen insists on a sun-kissed glow, suggest safer sunless methods, such as spray tans and other sunless gels or creams. 

By Prime Pediatrics
December 01, 2017
Category: Child Healthcare
Tags: Sick Children  

Sick Child

Colds may be common, but that does not mean caring for your child’s cold is easy. To help your little one feel better, your pediatrician is available to offer tips on what you need to know about your child’s cold. The common children’s cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract that usually lasts a week or two.  

The typical preschool-age child may experience 6-10 colds per year. Most colds resolve on their own with rest and fluids, but some may lead to ear infections, sinus infections, asthma attacks or other complications.  

Caused by viruses, colds can be spread through a sneeze or cough. The virus may also be spread indirectly, through touching the hand of a healthy person or even by using door handles with your hand you may have just sneezed or coughed into. Once the virus is present and multiplying, your child will develop the familiar symptoms and signs:

  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Mild fever, particularly in the evening
  • Decreased appetite
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • On-and-off irritability
  • Slightly swollen glands

Many parents become confused about the proper way to treat a coughing, sneezing child, because colds and allergies often have overlapping symptoms. When in doubt, talk to your pediatrician who will know exactly what is causing your child’s symptoms, especially if they are persistent or worsen with time.  

If your child has a typical cold without complications, the symptoms should disappear on their own after seven to ten days. Your pediatrician may want to see your child if symptoms do not improve and is not completely recovered within one week from the start of their illness.  

Contact your pediatrician for further treatment and to better understand your child’s cold symptoms.

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