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Posts for category: Pediatric Health

By Prime Pediatrics
November 05, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Child Care   Cold   Flu  

Cold Vs. Flu

Is it a cold or the flu? When it comes to your child's health, your pediatrician provides great information and guidance on the most common illnesses plaguing families. If you are wondering about the exact nature of your child's illness and how to treat it, learn the differences between a cold and the flu and how to treat and prevent them.

What is a cold?

A cold is an upper respiratory viral infection lasting 5 to 7 days in both adults and children alike. Generally milder in intensity and shorter in duration than influenza, a cold causes:

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • A runny nose
  • Tiredness
  • Low-grade fever
The Centers for Disease Control states that most healthy children experience 8 to 10 colds by the age of two years.
 
What is the flu?
 
The flu is a much more serious viral infection. Of sudden and intense onset, the flu usually comes with:
  • High fever
  • Body aches
  • Cough
  • Extreme tiredness
  • Severe headache
  • Chills
Also, the flu lasts longer and debilitates sufferers. It carries dangerous complications, particularly with young children, the elderly, asthmatics, diabetics and those with weak immune systems.
 
Treating colds and the flu
 
Treating a cold involves rest, fluids and decongestants as needed. The onset of a cold is gradual, and so is recovery. Typically, your child will not need to visit the pediatrician if he or she has a simple cold. Simple symptom relief works well. However, high and persistent fever merits a call to your child's doctor.
 
Regarding the flu, your pediatrician may do an in-office Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test (a throat or nasal swab) to confirm the diagnosis. They may prescribe antiviral medication and instruct on how to monitor a young child's symptoms. Keep your youngster well-hydrated, and administer acetaminophen or ibuprofen as directed.
 
If flu symptoms escalate (labored respirations, severe headache, rapid heart rate or anything that seems unusual to you), take your child to the nearest hospital ER for evaluation. Pneumonia is a frequent and life-threatening complication of influenza.
 
Prevention is the best medicine
 
Protect all members of the family with these simple measures:
  1. Eat a healthy diet.
  2. Stay well-hydrated.
  3. Avoid crowds during peak cold and flu season.
  4. Keep your child home from daycare and school if he or she is sick.
  5. Teach your child to cover his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing.
  6. Don't share food or utensils, even with family members.
  7. Vaccinate against the flu. Ask your pediatrician for your child's "shot."
Trust your pediatrician
 
They work hard to prevent acute illnesses such as colds and the flu. The doctor and professional team are great resources for prevention, healing and overall well-being for your children.
By Prime Pediatrics
August 30, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Pediatrician   Child Care  

Finding out you’re pregnant is a wonderfully exciting and whirlwind time. There are so many decisions to make as you watch your bump grow: What color should I paint the nursery? Do I want my little one to sleep with me? What do I need to childproof around the house? Of course, one of the most important things to think about is the health of your little one throughout the course of your pregnancy and once they are born. It’s never too soon to choose a pediatrician, and taking the time to find one you trust is important not just for your baby but also for you.

Once your little one is born they will be spending a lot of time with their pediatrician, so this is why it’s crucial that you find out that provides gentle, compassionate care and really takes time with you and your baby. The first two years of your baby’s life are so very important because this marks a significant developmental time for them, so it’s essential that you have a pediatrician that will be there to monitor their progress and detect any developmental delays or health problems right away.

The first pediatric visit will occur a few days after the birth. This first visit is vital, as it allows your children’s doctor to make sure everything functions as it should. This includes everything from reflexes to alertness to their hearing. Measurements are also taken to check their height and weight and to begin recording their development. Besides performing a physical exam to check the overall health of the baby this is also a time to answer any questions you might have about feeding schedules, habits, developmental milestones, etc.

After this initial visit, you should expect to bring your little one in for visits at:

  • 1 month
  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 9 months
  • 12 months
  • 15 months
  • 18 months
  • 24 months (2 years old)
  • 30 months
  • 3 years old

Once your child turns 3 years old they will only need to visit a pediatrician once a year, unless there are any health problems or concerns in the interim. These visits are imperative for every child as they are key to preventing certain illnesses through immunizations and physical checkups, tracking their growth and development, and also providing you with answers and support to help you properly care for your little one along the way. Call a pediatrician to schedule your child’s first appointment today.

By Prime Pediatrics
May 03, 2018
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Wellness Checkups  

Children need to go to the doctor for a wellness checkup at least once a year. At a wellness checkup, the pediatrician can help catch any wellness checkupsproblems early, when they may be easier to treat. Prime Pediatrics, which is located in Gaithersburg, MD, offers full-service, state-of-the-art pediatric care to children of all ages. Dr. Farnoush Jamali is one of the finest pediatricians in Gaithersburg, MD. Read on to find out why regular wellness checkups are so important.

About Wellness Checkups

Regular wellness checkups are an important aspect of children's health care. A wellness checkup is when you take your child to a pediatrician for a full checkup to make sure she or he is healthy and developing normally. This is different from other visits for injury or sickness.

Your Child's Medical History

During the wellness checkup, the pediatrician will have many questions about your child's medical history. Medical history checks help your child's doctor keep an eye for any patterns of chronic illness that may run in your family.

Physical Examination

During the wellness checkup, the doctor will do a comprehensive check of your child's body. This usually includes taking blood pressure and pulse readings, recording height and weight, and checking heart, lungs, abdomen, as well as ears, eyes, nose, skin, mouth, teeth and throat. The pediatrician will use growth charts to see how your child is growing compared with other children of the same gender and age.

Your Child's Vaccines

Illnesses that once killed children are highly preventable. During the wellness checkup, the doctor will give your child any necessary vaccinations that are due. Vaccinations are one of the best means of protection against contagious diseases. Research shows that children who are not vaccinated are at a much higher risk for getting sick.

Refilling Medications

An important task done at wellness checkups is managing and refilling medications. Speak with your child's doctor if you have questions about any medicine, including information about possible side effects or reactions. Both over-the-counter and prescription medications usually come with printed inserts about instructions on how to take the medication and common side effects. Read all information carefully before beginning the medication.

Advice & Guidance

During the wellness checkup, you will have an opportunity to get answers to your questions and medical advice. Your child's doctor may talk to you about nutrition, physical fitness, health and safety issues, and disease prevention. The pediatrician may ask about and provide counseling on behavioral problems, difficulties at school, learning problems, and other concerns.

If visits to the pediatrician haven't been one of your top priorities for the last few years, they should be. Don't wait another minute and call Prime Pediatrics at (301) 977-2440 today to schedule your child's wellness checkup in Gaithersburg, MD. A wellness checkup is among the best ways you can help protect your children's health and well-being.

By Prime Pediatrics
May 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Health
Tags: Mono  

Understanding Mono: The “Kissing Disease”Mono

Often called the kissing disease, mononucleosis (mono) is a caused by a virus that is transmitted through saliva. You can get this infection through kissing, but you can also be exposed through a cough or sneeze, or even by sharing a glass or food utensils with someone who has mono. However, mono is not as contagious as some infections, such as the common cold.

As an adolescent or young adult, your child is most likely to get mono with all the signs and symptoms.  If your child has mono, it is important to be careful of certain complications such as an enlarged spleen. Your pediatrician urges you to allow your child proper rest and adequate fluids for a full recovery.  

Some of the signs and symptoms of mononucleosis may include:

  • Fatigue
  • General feeling of being unwell
  • Sore throat that doesn’t get better with antibiotic use
  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes in neck and armpits
  • Swollen tonsils
  • Headache
  • Skin rash
  • Soft, swollen spleen

If your child is experience any of these symptoms, it is important to visit your pediatrician.

Since mononucleosis is spread through saliva, if your child is infected your pediatrician urges you to take extra precautions. To help prevent the spread of the virus, it is important to not kiss your child and not to share food, dishes, glasses and utensils until several days after his or her fever has subsided and even longer, if possible.

Contact your pediatrician for more information on mono and how you can help your child make a full recovery.